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Coronavirus

Bosnia Temporarily Suspends the Use of AstraZeneca Vaccines

SARAJEVO, Bosnia-Herzegovina — Bosnia has temporarily suspended the use of AstraZeneca vaccines as officials said Russia’s Sputnik V vaccines will arrive next week.

Officials in the governing entity run by the country’s Bosniaks and Croats have faced criticism for not acquiring vaccines earlier. So far, the Federation of Bosnia-Herzegovina entity has used only AstraZeneca vaccines donated by neighboring Serbia.

The public health office said late Tuesday said it was suspending the administration of the AstraZeneca until Thursday pending further recommendations from the European medical authorities.

On Wednesday, the entity Prime Minister Fadil Novalic said a batch of 100,000 Sputnik V vaccines should arrive in the country by the end of this week or on Monday. A total of 500,000 Russian vaccines have been ordered, said Novalic.

Bosnia expected to receive vaccine supplies through the U.N.-backed COVAX program. but deliveries have been delayed. The Bosnian Serb governing entity has used Russia’s Sputnik V vaccine, and health care workers have gone to Serbia to get shots.

Bosnia has seen a surge in reported coronavirus infections and a rising number of deaths in recent days. The main hospital in the capital of Sarajevo has declared an emergency and recalled staff members from vacations.

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