x

Economy

Tourism Comes Back Fast On COVID-Overrun Cyprus, Revenues Soar

ΝΙCOSIA – Despite having the world’s highest number of COVID-19 cases per capita, Cyprus still lured tourists through the autumn of 2021 with revenue in October matching levels for that period before the pandemic struck.

That month brought in 3102. million euros ($355.61 million) compared to only 77.4 million euros ($88.73) for October, 2020 when the Coronavirus was raging during a year of lockdowns and international air traffic almost halted.

October saw the largest inflow of tourists to Cyprus since the outbreak of the pandemic, with 391,638 arrivals, according to the Cyprus Statistical Service, said Kathimerini Cyprus.

For the period of January-October 2021, revenue from tourism was estimated at 1.35 billion euros ($1.5 billion) despite health restrictions on entry and many countries residents barred froom coming.

That was a giant jump from 380 million euros ($435.63 million) in the same period of 2020, a 260.2 percent increase as people began arriving again despite prospects of quarantines and other measures.

Compared with pre-Covid levels (January-October 2019), revenue from tourism marked a decrease of 46.5 percent, Cystat added, even in the face of lockdowns and changing health restrictions.

RELATED

NICOSIA - After decades of failure trying to reunify Cyprus, split by unlawful 1974 Turkish invasions, the United Nations Special Representative Colin William Stewart said it will stay that way, perhaps forever.

Top Stories

Columnists

A pregnant woman was driving in the HOV lane near Dallas.

General News

FALMOUTH, MA – The police in Falmouth have identified the victim in an accident involving a car plunging into the ocean on February 20, NBC10 Boston reported.

General News

NEW YORK – Meropi Kyriacou, the new Principal of The Cathedral School in Manhattan, was honored as The National Herald’s Educator of the Year.

Video

After Amazon, Google’s First Cloud Region Coming to Greece

ATHENS - Despite having a costly Internet that’s the slowest in the European Union, Greece is continuing to attract high-tech giants, with Alphabet’s Google planning to create its first cloud region in the country.

Enter your email address to subscribe

Provide your email address to subscribe. For e.g. abc@xyz.com

You may unsubscribe at any time using the link in our newsletter.