x

Columnists

This Week in History: October 18th to 24th

October 19, 2019

October 18th:

On this day in 1918, Konstantinos Mitsotakis, the former Prime Minister of Greece, was born in Chalepa, Crete. Throughout his upbringing, and indeed the rest of his adult life, Mitsotakis was at the epicenter of Greek political life. When the Axis occupation commenced in 1941, Mitsotakis immediately signed up to be in the resistance. He joined the National Organization of Crete (EOK) for a more concerted effort to combat the Nazis. Mitsotakis was a part of an intelligence network known as the ‘quintuplets’, where he was responsible for opening channels of communication between Allied commanders and anti-Nazi Greek revolutionary forces. For these actions, Mitsotakis was sentenced to death (twice) and imprisoned by the Nazi occupiers. Because of his knowledge of German and his moral standing, his life was spared. For his bravery and courage in the resistance against the Nazis, Mitsotakis was awarded numerous medals from the Greek and British governments. As the nephew of the liberal statesman Eleftherios Venizelos, Mitsotakis was first elected to Parliament as a member of the Liberal Party in 1946. In 1977, Mitsotakis re-entered Parliament at the head of the small Neoliberal Party and, the following year, joined the governing New Democracy party, serving first as Finance Minister and later as Foreign Minister. He became the party’s leader in 1984 while the conservatives were in opposition. Mitsotakis narrowly won the elections in 1990. As Prime Minister, he reined in the more far-right elements of New Democracy and infused liberalism into the party. He sought to simplify the tax code, overhaul the constitution, encourage privatization of state assets, reduce the deficit and improve relations with the United States. He accomplished all of these goals. After his resignation as party leader, Mitsotakis often made public statements urging governments to take bolder steps in their market reforms, and he led an unsuccessful effort for Greece’s President to be elected directly by the people. Mitsotakis and his wife, Marika Giannoukou (who passed away in 2012), had four children: Dora, Katerina, Alexandra, and Kyriakos. He enjoyed good health until late in life and lived long enough to meet several great-grandchildren as well as to see his youngest child and only son, Kyriakos, elected as leader of New Democracy in January of 2016.

October 19th:

On this day in 1951, Demetrios Christodoulou, the Greek mathematician, physicist and recipient of the Bocher Memorial Prize was born in Athens, Greece. After receiving his doctorate in physics from Princeton University in 1971, he eventually became a professor of mathematics – first at Syracuse University, then at New York University and finally at Princeton. He then moved to Zurich where he continued his teaching career at the ETH in Zurich, Switzerland. Christodoulou is internationally well-known for his contributions to Einstein’s equations of general relativity and his work on the formation of black holes. He has received a plethora of awards throughout the years and continues his work rigorously. In an autobiography published on The Shaw Prize, Christodoulou writes: “I was born to a lower middle class family. My father was born in Alexandria to Greek parents from Cyprus who had immigrated to Egypt. My mother was born in Athens to a family of Greek refugees from Asia Minor. Neither of my parents had higher education, but my father inspired me in childhood with stories from a distant past when ancient Greece had made outstanding contributions to human civilization.”

October 20th:

On this day in 1968, Jacqueline Kennedy married Greek shipping tycoon Aristotle Onassis on Onassis’ private island of Scorpios. With the marriage, Jacqueline Kennedy became Jackie ‘O’ to the mainstream public. The marriage was a watershed moment for Onassis as he sought to cement his prestige internationally. Prior to his wedding to Jackie, Onassis was married to Athina Livanou from 1946 to 1960 and had a much publicized extramarital affair with Maria Callas from 1957 to 1968. On her end, following the assassination of both her husband and her husband’s brother, Jackie no longer felt safe in the United States and considered her children to be the next logical targets for any potential future Kennedy killing. By marrying Onassis, Jackie acquired financial security, privacy on his secluded private island of Skorpios, and gained the ability to truly explore her interests now that she was no longer married to a politician. The couple remained married until Onassis’ death on March 15, 1975. Jackie never remarried, but she did have a long time companion, diamond merchant Maurice Tempelsman, from 1980 to her death in 1994.

RELATED

I began issuing annual report cards to presidents in January 2010, which marked the end of Barack Obama’s first full year in office, and the 14-month anniversary of this column.

Top Stories

Society

ATHENS — A severe weather front has hit Greece, with below-freezing temperatures and snowfall in many parts of the country, including the capital Athens and many Aegean islands.

Events

BROOMALL, PA – The community of St Luke in Broomall held the annual cutting of the Vasilopita event on January 23.

Society

ATHENS – Women in Greece – those who survive – are coming out to report domestic violence that has become endemic in the county, with 5,705 cases in the first 10 months of 2021, when there was a rash of femicide.

Video

Biden Caught on Hot Mic Swearing at Fox News Reporter

WASHINGTON — President Joe Biden responded to a question about inflation by calling a Fox News reporter a vulgarity.

Enter your email address to subscribe

Provide your email address to subscribe. For e.g. abc@xyz.com

You may unsubscribe at any time using the link in our newsletter.