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Tavli Talk

Your chips are the darker color. Your opponent Sam rolled 6-2 to open the game and moved 12-18 and 1-3, as shown in Figure 1. You then roll 6-1. How should you play it?

Some players think hitting the opponent’s chip is always the best option, and might play 24-18 and 24-23. While that’s not a terrible move, the better way to go here is 13-7 and 8-7, as shown in Figure 2. By doing so, you establish a strong three-point prime (wall) with two of Sam’s chips trapped behind it, and if Sam doesn’t cover up the chip on your 18-point, you can hit it on the next play anyway.

For more backgammon tips, read Constantinos Scaros’ book Play Fearless Backgammon!, available in hardcover, paperback, and Kindle formats on amazon.com.

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