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Funerals

Stanley Neamonitis, a Champion of the Community, Passed Away

May 31, 1939 – July 16, 2016

Stanley Neamonitis, beloved husband, father, father-in-law, and brother passed away on July 16, 2016 surrounded by his family at his home in Manhasset, New York.
 
Born in the village of Avgonima, Chios on May 31, 1939, he was the fourth of five children and only son to John and Evangelia Neamonitis.
 
He and his family immigrated to the United States on July 28, 1951 when he was 12 and settled in Bay Ridge, Brooklyn. He began working the very next day at his uncle’s fruit store.
 
He attended Fort Hamilton High School, and later Brooklyn College at night where he received his Associate Degree in Business Administration. He later took business classes at Baruch College in Manhattan while working as a clerk in a Safeway supermarket chain.
 
In 1957, Stanley joined the Quaker Oats Company in Manhattan as a trading clerk, a position that served as a stepping stone into a life-long career in international commodity trading. 
 
With the draft overhanging him, he enlisted in the United States Army in 1959 and dutifully served during the Cold War until 1961 when he was honorably discharged.
 
Following his service, he continued a career in international metals trading that would span five decades.
 
He held senior trading positions at Associated Metals, Phillip Brothers, and Swiss-trading conglomerate, Glencore, traveling extensively throughout Canada, Europe, South America, Asia, Australia, and South Africa. He made friendships and built life-long relationships on every continent.
 
While he formally retired in 2001 to spend more time with his wife Litsa and two sons, John and Chris, he continued to work as a senior consultant, advisor and executive board member for numerous multi-national metals & mining companies, and as an active real estate investor managing properties in Brooklyn and Manhattan.
 
Throughout his life, Stanley dedicated his time tirelessly to the Church and the broader Greek Community. He served on the Parish Council of the Archangel Michael Greek Orthodox Church for 30 years, holding many leadership positions during that time, including a term as President. He was an active member of AHEPA as well as President of the Panchiaki Korais Society from 2013-2015.  His faithful service to the community over the years earned him the honor of the Hellenic Thread Award in 2013.

He was a kind and gentle man who loved his family above all else. He was an incredible story-teller and historian. He had a passion for New York Mets baseball, golf, and family trips to Aruba. He strongly supported the US Armed Forces and the contributions and sacrifices of fellow veterans who served to protect the freedoms of the United States of America.
 
Stanley is survived by his wife of 36 years, Litsa, his two sons, John and Chris, his daughter-in-law, Francesca and his three sisters, Despina Elisson, Hariklia Amentas, and Georgia Vavas.

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