GR US

Biden's Pro-Immigration Policy

Αssociated Press

FILE - In this Oct. 27, 2020, file photo, then-Democratic presidential candidate former Vice President Joe Biden speaks at Mountain Top Inn & Resort in Warm Springs, Ga. President-elect Joe Biden has evoked Franklin Delano Roosevelt in promising a remaking of America unseen since the New Deal. (AP Photo/Andrew Harnik, File)

In the heavy fog of the unprecedented events that have been happening lately, it is difficult to discern the great change that is taking place in the quality of the authority that will be sworn in on Wednesday, January 20th. The difference between Trump and Biden could not be more noticeable. Joe Biden does not scream. He does not create problems every day. He does not provoke. With seriousness, calmness, and his smile, he is changing the image of governmental power in America.

He is dealing with the most serious problems facing the country. Regarding the coronavirus – he promises to vaccinate 100 million people in the first hundred days of his presidency. For economic recovery he has already announced an astronomical amount of $1.9 trillion in stimulus. He is restoring ties with our allies. And he has assembled an experienced, highly qualified team to assist him in implementing his policies. The differences from the recent past, on all levels, could not have been greater.

One of the items on Biden’s agenda is the issue of immigration, an issue that concerns us directly. Donald Trump's presidency is characterized by his extreme anti-immigration policy and rhetoric which paints the illegal immigrant as the enemy of the American worker. As the one who deprived him/her of their job and their dignity. And it was not just words. The separation of 5,000 children from their parents on the southern border will go down in history as one of the inhumane acts of his government. But it was not just illegal immigrants. There were also the educated, the scientists, whom the high tech companies needed, but could not obtain visas for them.

A cloud of suspicion, denial, and hostility covered mainly the illegal immigrants - people from many parts of the world who did not meet all the necessary prerequisites for entering and staying in the country, among whom – not only once upon a time but even now – are some of our compatriots.

So one of Biden's first decisions was to ask Congress to provide legal coverage to some 11 million people and, in addition, to put them on the path to American citizenship. There could be no greater change in immigration policy than this. It will be the first time since the Reagan era, when citizenship was granted to 3 million people in 1986. Ron Klain, the new White House Chief of Staff, said Biden would send the new immigration bill to Congress on the first day of his presidency. The change in immigration is a change in the spirit, the principles, but also the needs of the country.

And it is proof of the change for the better in the quality of government that will take power in the country on January 20.