x

Health

Novo Nordisk Plans Price Cuts for Several Insulins

Novo Nordisk will start slashing some U.S. insulin prices up to 75% next year, following a path set earlier this month by rival Eli Lilly.

The Danish drugmaker said Tuesday that pre-filled pens and vials of long- and short-acting insulins will see list price reductions. They include Levemir, Novolin, NovoLog and NovoLog Mix70/30.

Novo also will drop the list price of unbranded products like Insulin Aspart to match the lower price of the branded insulins.

The price cuts go into effect Jan. 1. A vial of NovoLog and NovoLog Mix 70/30 will drop 75% to $72.34 from $289.36. FlexPen options will fall to $139.71 from more than $500.

Levemir and Novolin vials and FlexPens will drop 65% from their current list prices.

Eli Lilly and Co. said March 2 that it will cut the list prices for its most commonly prescribed insulin, Humalog, and for another insulin, Humulin, by 70% or more in the fourth quarter, which starts in October.

List prices are what a drugmaker initially sets for a product and what people who have no insurance or plans with high deductibles are sometimes stuck paying.

Patient advocates have long called for insulin price cuts to help uninsured people who would not be affected by price caps tied to insurance coverage. They have noted that high insulin prices force many people to ration doses, which can be dangerous for their health.

Research has shown that prices for insulin have more than tripled in the last two decades. Pressure is growing on drugmakers to help patients.

Major insulin makers like Lilly and Novo have said they offer patient assistance programs and other help. But Lilly CEO David Ricks noted earlier this month that discounts the drugmaker offers from its list prices often don’t reach patients through insurers or pharmacy benefit managers.

The federal government in January started applying a $35 cap on monthly out-of-pocket costs to patients with coverage through its Medicare program for people age 65 and older or those who have certain disabilities or illnesses.

Insulin is made by the pancreas and used by the body to convert food into energy. People who have diabetes don’t produce enough insulin. Those with Type 1 diabetes must take insulin every day to survive.

More than 8 million Americans use insulin, according to the American Diabetes Association.

The Wall Street Journal first reported the price cuts Tuesday morning.


By TOM MURPHY AP Health Writer

RELATED

LILANDA, Zambia (AP) — Extreme weather events have hit parts of Africa relentlessly in the last three years, with tropical storms, floods and drought causing crises of hunger and displacement.

Top Stories

Columnists

A pregnant woman was driving in the HOV lane near Dallas.

General News

NEW YORK – Meropi Kyriacou, the new Principal of The Cathedral School in Manhattan, was honored as The National Herald’s Educator of the Year.

Video

2 Germans, a Spaniard and a Senegalese Killed in Building Collapse in Spain’s Mallorca Island

MADRID (AP) — Spain's National Police on Friday gave details on four people killed when a building housing a bar and restaurant club collapsed on the island of Mallorca.

AUSTIN, Texas  — Families in Uvalde took more legal action Friday on the second anniversary of the Robb Elementary School attack, suing Meta Platforms, which owns Instagram, and the maker of the video game “Call of Duty” over claims the companies bear responsibility for products used by the teenage gunman.

ATHENS - The head of the tax office in Chalkida, Evia and another staff member were detained on Friday after testifying over charges of corruption.

TEL AVIV, Israel  — Egypt said Friday it has agreed to send U.

Enter your email address to subscribe

Provide your email address to subscribe. For e.g. [email protected]

You may unsubscribe at any time using the link in our newsletter.