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Science

New Opportunities for Columbia Students to Engage in Public Humanities and Connect to Greece

NEW YORK — The Stavros Niarchos Foundation Public Humanities Initiative (SNFPHI) at Columbia University has announced the launch of a new practicum and the second round of a summer grant program, which together will allow undergraduates, graduate students, and recent PhDs to pursue projects related to Hellenic studies intended for a wide audience.

The new Virtual Research Practicum in Public Humanities and Hellenic Studies incorporates a Hellenic studies seminar, a public humanities workshop, and an independent project conducted together with Columbia faculty and partners in Greece. Additionally, a second round of summer grantees will pursue independent projects in Hellenic studies and collaborate with ongoing SNFPHI projects in Greece.

SNFPHI aims create a collaborative bridge across the Atlantic, activating latent creative potential in Greece while drawing on the intellectual traditions of one of the United States’ premier research universities. Established in 2019, SNFPHI is exclusively supported by the Stavros Niarchos Foundation (SNF).

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