x

Politics

Libyan Interim PM Meets Turkey’s Leader to Boost Ties

ANKARA, Turkey — The head of Libya's new interim government, Prime Minister Abdul Hamid Dbeibah, met with Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan in Ankara on Monday for talks aimed at boosting cooperation between their nations.

Libya's interim government, which took power last month, is meant to bring together a country that has been torn apart by civil war for nearly a decade. It is also aims to steer through a general election on Dec. 24.

Turkey has been closely involved in Libya, backing the U.N.-recognized Government of National Accord (GNA), based in the capital Tripoli that controlled the west, against the Libyan National Army (LNA), based in Benghazi that controlled the east. Turkey sent military supplies and fighters to Libya, helping to tilt the balance of power in favor of the Tripoli government. 

Turkey also signed an agreement with the Tripoli-based government in 2019 to delineate the maritime boundaries between the two countries — a move that angered Greece and Cyprus. Both countries denounced the agreement which they said amounted to a serious breach of international law in disregard of the rights of other eastern Mediterranean countries.

Dbeibah, who is accompanied by a large delegation that includes 14 ministers, will jointly chair the first meeting of the so-called Turkey-Libya High Level Strategic Cooperation Council together with Erdogan. 

Turkish media reports said the two countries will aim to increase cooperation in energy and health and will also the discuss the return of Turkish companies to complete stalled projects in the oil-rich North African nation.

Dbeibah has been trying to strike a balance between Turkey and Greece, following Athens' concerns over the maritime deal with the Tripoli-based administration had struck with Turkey. Dbeibah has said his government is willing to establish a joint Libyan-Greek committee to resume negotiations to set the sea boundary between the two countries and demarcate an exclusive economic zone for oil and gas drilling rights.

Libya was plunged into chaos when a NATO-backed uprising in 2011 toppled longtime ruler Moammar Gadhafi, who was later killed. The country was in recent years split between rival east- and west-based administrations, each backed by different armed groups and foreign governments.

RELATED

ATHENS - Government spokesperson Yiannis Oikonomou on Thursday described the arrival of the first six Rafale military aircraft from France on Wednesday as a geostrategic development of high importance, which makes the Greek Air Force one of the strongest in the region, seals the Defence Agreement with France while promoting the strategic autonomy of the European Union.

Top Stories

Church

NEW YORK - Some 21 years after it was destroyed in the September 11, 2001 terrorist attacks in the United States that brought down the Twin Towers in New York City, the new St Nicholas Greek Orthodox Church rising in its place is among the most eagerly awaited architectural openings of 2022.

Events

STATEN ISLAND, NY – For yet another year, the community of Holy Trinity-St Nicholas in Staten Island honored couples celebrating 50+ years of marriage with a modest ceremony held at the church immediately following the Divine Liturgy on January 16.

Society

NEW YORK – New research into Greek artifacts looted by the Nazis was highlighted in the New York Times on January 18 as “the topic of the Nazi role in antiquities looting is increasingly drawing attention, in part through the work of scholars who are peeling back the mysteries of what happened to the objects that were excavated or seized eight decades ago.

Video

SNF’s Health Initiative Will Support Child and Adolescent Mental Health

ATHENS - When we think about childhood injuries, we usually think of scratches, a few stitches, maybe even a broken bone.

Enter your email address to subscribe

Provide your email address to subscribe. For e.g. abc@xyz.com

You may unsubscribe at any time using the link in our newsletter.