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Sciences

J&J Agrees to Pay $230M to Settle New York Opioid Claim

NEW YORK — The New York attorney general says Johnson & Johnson has agreed to pay $230 million to settle claims that the pharmaceutical giant helped fuel the opioid crisis.

The deal announced on Saturday requires Johnson & Johnson to make a series of payments over nine years that will cover the total. The drugmaker also agreed to end the manufacturing and distribution of opioids across New York and the rest of the nation, Attorney General Letitia James said in statement.

The company "helped fuel this fire, but today they're committing to leaving the opioid business — not only in New York, but across the entire country," James said. 

Johnson & Johnson said in a statement on Saturday that the settlement "is not an admission of liability or wrongdoing by the company." 

It added that its actions "relating to the marketing and promotion of important prescription pain medications were appropriate and responsible."

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Big Voting Bill Faces Defeat as 2 Dems Won’t Stop Filibuster

WASHINGTON — Voting legislation that Democrats and civil rights leaders say is vital for protecting democracy appeared headed for defeat as the Senate churned into debate, a devastating setback enabled by President Joe Biden's own party as two holdout senators refuse to support rule changes to overcome a Republican filibuster.