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Events

Greek Cultural Center Presents Concert for the 1973 Polytechnic Uprising 

November 15, 2022

ASTORIA – The Greek Cultural Center, 26-80 30th Street in Astoria, presents a live concert on Saturday, November 19, 8 PM, for the anniversary of the Athens Polytech Uprising of 1973. Everyone is invited to attend the commemoration of this important historic event. The concert is free.

More information is available by phone: 718-726-7329 and online: https://www.greekculturalcenter.org/.

The Athens Polytechnic uprising began on November 14, 1973 as a massive student demonstration against the Greek military junta of 1967-1974. The demonstration escalated into an open anti-junta revolt, and ended in bloodshed in the early morning of November 17 after a tank crashed through the gates of the Athens Polytechnic. Police surrounded the Polytechnic and the army was called in. Forty people were killed, 24 identified and 16 unidentified, while 1,103 verified injuries were reported, though the total number of injured is likely over 2,000. Among those killed was a 5 1/2 year old boy who was shot while crossing the street with his mother.

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