x

USA

For NBA Players, Taylor Grand Jury Decision “Not Enough”

September 24, 2020

LAKE BUENA VISTA, Fla. — LeBron James sent the word to the Los Angeles Lakers in a group text on Wednesday afternoon, and basketball suddenly seemed irrelevant.

A grand jury in Kentucky had finally spoken. And James was letting his team know that NBA players, who have spent months seeking justice for Breonna Taylor, did not get what they wanted.

"Something was done," Lakers guard Danny Green said, "but it wasn't enough."

Wednesday's decision by the grand jury, which brought no charges against Louisville police for Taylor's killing and only three counts of wanton endangerment against fired Officer Brett Hankison for shooting into Taylor's neighbors' homes, was not unexpected by many NBA players and coaches. While there were no drugs in Taylor's apartment, her boyfriend shot and wounded a police officer. State Attorney General Daniel Cameron said the officers' shots that killed Taylor were fired in self-defense.

"I know we've been using our platform down here to try to bring about education and a voice in a lot of players on our team, especially also spoken out on justice for Breonna Taylor," Denver coach Michael Malone said. "We have not gotten that justice."

Teams came to Walt Disney World to finish the season and crown a champion, and hoping that the platform of the NBA's restart bubble could help amplify calls for change. Players and coaches have used the NBA spotlight to make statements at a time when the demand for racial equality and an end to police brutality is resonating as loudly as it has in generations.

And Taylor's story — the tale of a 26-year-old Black woman who was killed March 13 by police in Louisville when they burst into her apartment on a no-knock warrant during a narcotics investigation centered around a suspect who did not live there — has captivated NBA players. There were no drugs in Taylor's apartment. Her boyfriend shot and wounded a police officer during the raid and Kentucky State Attorney General Daniel Cameron said the officers' shots that killed Taylor were fired in self-defense.

Many NBA players have met, virtually, with members of her family to offer support. They say her name in news conferences, wear it on shirts, scrawl it onto their sneakers.

"We have moms. We have sisters, nieces, aunties. And just like men of color have experienced traumatic instances, so have women," Boston forward Jaylen Brown said. "That is an example of some things that happen to women in our country. So, we wanted to stand alongside them, but also make it that it's not just us. I think the future is female, so it's important to show our sisters that we care. That's why it's been important."

Even for teams not in the bubble, it mattered. Atlanta coach Lloyd Pierce leads a committee of NBA coaches tasked with finding new ways to use their own platform to create change, and he's encouraged his own players — Black and white alike — to speak out and take action, whether in Atlanta or their own community.

Pierce took Wednesday's news hard.

"Yeah, there was a grand jury and yeah, they went through the information and yeah, they have facts to support whatever the claims may be," Pierce said. "But that doesn't provide any justice for those that are on the outside, those that feel like the police and law enforcement are there to protect them. … What currently is happening isn't good enough."

National Basketball Players Association executive director Michele Roberts went a step further. "Sadly, there was no justice today for Breonna Taylor," Roberts said. "Her killing was the result of a string of callous and careless decisions made with a lack of regard for humanity, ultimately resulting in the death of an innocent and beautiful woman with her entire life ahead of her."

The league shut down for three days last month  when a boycott that was started by the Milwaukee Bucks — in response to the shooting by police of a Black man, Jacob Blake, in Kenosha, Wisconsin — nearly caused players to end the season because they felt their pleas for change were not being taken seriously enough.

And Wednesday's news was another disappointment for them.

"We feel like we've taken a step back, that we haven't made the progress we were seeking," Green said. "Our voices aren't being heard loud enough. But we're not going to stop. We're going to continue. We're going to continue fighting, we're going to continue to push, we're going to continue to use our voices."

RELATED

DENVER (AP) — It's almost hard to picture a postseason without both LeBron James and Stephen Curry.

Top Stories

Columnists

A pregnant woman was driving in the HOV lane near Dallas.

General News

NEW YORK – Meropi Kyriacou, the new Principal of The Cathedral School in Manhattan, was honored as The National Herald’s Educator of the Year.

Video

By Defining Sex, Some States Are Denying Transgender People Legal Recognition

TOPEKA, Kan. (AP) — Mack Allen, an 18-year-old high school senior from Kansas, braces for sideways glances, questioning looks and snide comments whenever he has to hand over his driver's license, which still identifies him as female.

HEMPSTEAD, NY – The Maids of Athena District 6 Lodge held their first ever mid-year conference on February 24 at St.

STAMFORD, CONNECTICUT - Is Michelle Troconis a murderous conspirator who wanted her boyfriend's estranged wife dead and helped him cover up her killing? Or was she an innocent bystander who unwittingly became ensnared in one of Connecticut's most enduring missing person and alleged homicide cases? A state jury heard two different tales of the 49-year-old Troconis as the prosecution and defense made their closing arguments Tuesday in Stamford.

LONDON — Kensington Palace says Britain's Prince William has pulled out of attending a memorial service for his godfather, the late King Constantine of Greece, because of a personal matter.

MONTREAL/NEW YORK – The Maids of Athena (MOA) District 6 (New York) and District 23 (Eastern Canada) Lodges held their first ever inter-district Zoom fundraising event on February 20.

Enter your email address to subscribe

Provide your email address to subscribe. For e.g. [email protected]

You may unsubscribe at any time using the link in our newsletter.