x

Society

COVID-19 Rained Grief on New York in April; Will May Be better?

NEW YORK  — New York's horrible April — among the worst in its history — is over. Only time will tell if the coronavirus pandemic that made it so awful will fade in May.

When the month began, the virus was already raging. Nearly 2,000 people were dead. Gov. Andrew Cuomo warned that one model predicted as many as 16,000 deaths once the outbreak was over.

At the time, that seemed grim. Reality has been worse.

Though Wednesday, the virus was believed to have killed at least 23,600 people in the state, including around 5,300 people who died before their infection could be confirmed by a lab test.

That's nearly nine times the number of people who died in the Sept. 11 attacks. Most experts agree the figure is an undercount, since it only includes deaths where the link to COVID-19 was certain enough to be included on a death certificate.

May begins where March ended, but with more hopeful news that the worst is over. The state's daily fatality count, which peaked with 799 deaths on April 8, has declined to roughly where it was at the close of March, with 306 people deaths Wednesday.

The number of people hospitalized with the virus has slid to approximately where it was one month ago, too, after hitting a peak in mid April.

On Wednesday a navy hospital ship that had steamed to New York City to assist with the pandemic departed. A temporary hospital, set up in Manhattan's main convention center, is close to closing, too, as the city's hospitals have proven able to handle the load of patients.

But while other parts of the nation have started to lift restrictions on social interaction, New York City is still ratcheting down. On Thursday, Cuomo announced that the city's subway system would curtail overnight service to make it easier to disinfect trains, amid fresh fears that bringing people together on public transit helps the virus spread.

RELATED

SAN FRANCISCO — The unabashedly liberal city of San Francisco became the unlikely proponent of weaponized police robots last week after supervisors approved limited use of the remote-controlled devices, addressing head-on an evolving technology that has become more widely available even if it is rarely deployed to confront suspects.

Top Stories

Columnists

A pregnant woman was driving in the HOV lane near Dallas.

General News

FALMOUTH, MA – The police in Falmouth have identified the victim in an accident involving a car plunging into the ocean on February 20, NBC10 Boston reported.

General News

NEW YORK – Meropi Kyriacou, the new Principal of The Cathedral School in Manhattan, was honored as The National Herald’s Educator of the Year.

Video

Camels a Common Sight for World Cup Visitors (Photos + Video)

DOHA, Qatar — Two weeks into the first World Cup in the Middle East, fewer teams are at the tournament and some fans are starting to make long journeys home.

ATLANTA — The extended Senate campaign in Georgia gives Democratic Sen.

WASHINGTON — Former President Donald Trump faced rebuke Sunday from officials in both parties after calling for the "termination" of parts of the Constitution over his lie that the 2020 election was stolen.

CHICAGO — Legislation that ensures same-sex and interracial marriages are recognized as legal unions appears headed for final approval and President Joe Biden's signature, a bipartisan agreement that reflects a wider acceptance of gay rights in both Congress and the country.

ARLINGTON, Texas — Dallas safety Malik Hooker had no idea what he was starting with a fumble return for a touchdown early in the fourth quarter against his former team.

Enter your email address to subscribe

Provide your email address to subscribe. For e.g. abc@xyz.com

You may unsubscribe at any time using the link in our newsletter.