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Editorial

Anti-Eavesdropping Measures

Although it is not mentioned anywhere in the announcements issued, it is considered certain that the resignations of the director of the Hellenic Intelligence Service (EYP) and the director of the Prime Minister’s Office – as its immediate supervisor – are related to the matter of the attempt to hack the cell phone of the president of PASOK-KINAL, Nikos Androulakis.

And that in itself is commendable, as is the fact that Grigoris Dimitriadis, the Prime Minister’s nephew, resigned apparently to deprive Mitsotakis’ opponents of the opportunity to throw mud at the Greek leader.

Their resignations were immediately accepted by Prime Minister Kyriakos Mitsotakis, no matter how personally difficult it was for him.

That is, he proves in practice that he considers the issue of phone tapping to be an extremely serious matter, and that he is determined to find the culprits and punish those responsible.

This decision by Mr. Mitsotakis is another example of the modernizing trend in the Greek government compared with the situation that prevailed until now in Greece.

Thus, instead of the usual cover-up that would have been attempted in the past, Mr. Mitsotakis followed the path of protecting the nation’s institutions, opening the way for the cleaning up of the situation.

In my commentary on this issue titled, ‘The crime of electronic eavesdropping and its implications,’ I wrote: “We hope it will be fully resolved soon. This issue should not hang like a sword of Damocles over the heads of Mr. Androulakis’ political opponents…”

And this clearly was the path chosen by the Prime Minister.

The opposition will use the familiar tactics it has followed in so many cases until now – using distortion and misinformation to hurt the Prime Minister. However, the bottom line is that the Prime Minister acted immediately. He is already treating it as a serious matter. That is why he accepted the resignations of his close associates. Isn’t that what he was expected to do?

Let him be judged by the extent to which the investigation to clear up the case is thorough, deep, and objective.

However, while the authorities investigate the matter, the country must be governed, the government should continue to do its job.

This is no time for paralysis…for fanaticism… for actions and words that divide society.

The government should be focused on the big and serious problems facing the country, such as the Turkish threats.

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