Mary Metaxas, Intelligent and Gracious at Cathedral, Has Passed Away

NEW YORK – Outside it might have been the hottest day of the year but inside Holy Trinity Cathedral in Manhattan friends and family bid farewell to Mary Metaxas, who had one of the warmest hearts many of them had ever encountered.
The Dean of the Cathedral, Fr. Anastasios Gounaris, presided over the funeral service, which was preceded by a viewing in the church. Gounaris told the congregation that in speaking about Metaxas, he was at a disadvantage for not having known her, since he became Dean only a year ago, but he sensed her beauty of soul through the love for her that he experienced through others.
Indeed, Metaxas was an intelligent and gracious presence at the Cathedral. She attended its popular social and spiritual events, but she herself was one of the reasons people who lived far away often attended, one of her friends told TNH.
Her son, CBS News anchor and correspondent John Metaxas, eulogized his mother on the solea of the Cathedral she loved and for which his father Takis played such a prominent role prior to his untimely passing two decades ago.
A number of people noted that the ebullient past Parish Council president and his wife were a strong and effective combination in the community.
A few of those present spoke for the many who wished to attend but could not.
“Mary was timeless. Classic and classy,” said Effie Lekas, the assistant director of the Queens College Center for Byzantine and Modern Greek studies, who attended the funeral with its director, Dr. Christos Ioannides.
Lekas expressed the feelings and appreciation of many. “She was a woman ahead of her time. Brilliant but unassuming,” she said, adding that “she sacrificed her career to be the best mother and the best wife.”
“They were a beautiful couple and family and they left a big mark on the Greek-American community,” Lekas said, and added that Mary would tell her “the cherry on top of a great life,” was watching her grandchildren grow up.
Takis Metaxas was a member of the Center’s Board of Directors and after his untimely passing, his son John took his place, “and has become one of our greatest and staunchest supporters,” Lekas said. {65536}

“Everyone who met Mary could never forget her because of her kind heart and good soul,” Lekas said. and she appreciated Mary’s moral support and advice when she began to work at the Center. “Mary taught me to stand my ground with strong personalities on the Board, including her husband, Takis.”
From the beginning Mary was Lekas’ guardian angel and a second mentor after the Center’s founder, the late Dr. Harry Psomiades. She said she learned much from the way Mary handled her relationships, “with grace, silently. “
During his eulogy, John Metaxas noted his mother was a very religious person, but Lekas noted “she did not wear it on her sleeve, but she lived her religion. She always gave people the benefit of the doubt. “
Mary was a native New Yorker. Her son said, “She was born on 72nd Street, moved to 70th and lived most of it on 74th street. Mary would often joke: “I went far in life.”
After the eulogy, Mary’s grandson Giannis, who was sat next to his mother, Irene Metaxas, offered her a musical tribute. Everyone was touched by his violin presentation of the beloved hymn to the Theotokos “Ti Ypermaho.” He also read a tribute via iPad from his sister Christiana, who was in Spain and could not return to New York in time.
Metaxas’ grandchildren reminded all those who loved her of what they learned long ago, to never mistake her silence for absence. Her words and deeds will remain like music in their souls.