Greek-American Families Stick Together

Many stories have been written about the early migration of our parents and grandparents. Such was the story of a family from Lowell, Mass.

Many stories have been written about the early migration of our parents and  grandparents. Such was the story of a family from Lowell, Mass., a city that once had the largest population of Greek immigrants. My relationship with this family is by marriage.

The family’s name was Kalantzakos. In May, 1936, the mother, Ourania, died, leaving six motherless children. The oldest being Sophie Antonakos (age 12). The state was about to take the children, but the father, Nikita, said, “We will take care of our children.”

Sophie then became a mother figure. They all survived the hard times and are able to meet regularly in spite of the tragedies that came. When we speak of “family ties” we use them as an example.

In spite of all the difficulties endured over the years, the family still meets for different occasions. I am writing this as a tribute to the family life of our parents, whose love of
family and church is alive and well.

Elizabeth Antonakos
Quincy, Mass.