Of Greek Jews, Passover, and the Greek Media

I note that you have offered no dedication to Greek-Jews for Passover, after all, they are readers, too. Nonetheless, I welcome two articles of yours: commentaries.

I note that you have offered no dedication, or greeting, to Greek-Jews for Passover, after all, they are readers, too.
Nonetheless, I welcome two articles of yours: your commentaries about the sorry state of the press in Greece and, I would add, locally (“Highs and Lows in Journalism,” Apr. 19), and on the book by Christos Alexopoulos: Hello Hellas, Goodbye Greece 1821-2012 (ekirikas.com).

It is no accident, I maintain, that Alexopoulos encompasses the two centuries of Greek independence since breaking away from Ottoman rule; for the country might have achieved nominal sovereignty, but it has existed incorporating all of the ills of Turkish rule – nepotism, corruption, flexible work ethic, bureaucratic sclerosis – added to some pathogens uniquely Greek (ethnic and religious intolerance, even racism, along with the trio of anti-Semitism, anti-Zionism, and, alas, anti-Americanism).

Viewed from this prism, remaining faithful to the long-overdue reforms, even radical changes specified in the Memoranda, a veritable grand opportunity to emerge from the financial crisis a competitive, progressive, finally modern European nation, is a well-hidden blessing which the mere change of name – from Greece to Hellas – does not satisfy!

Greece will become admirable, a source of pride for all those who wish her well, when an overwhelming majority recognizes the tragic deficiencies of its polity, in all spheres, and honestly, openly, courageously, even fearlessly, begins to grapple problems neglected, if they were ever even recognized.

 

Asher J. Matathias

Woodmere, NY

1 Comment

  1. Asher your letter is short, very accurate, and dead on! I hope now that the Greek people have hit rock bottom a lot of good comes out of this. We can only wait and see if the attitudes begin to change a little.

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