Anastasiades Says Energy Peace Key

Forty years of division separating Cypriots from Turks who unlawfully occupy the northern third of the island, could end because of energy reserves, President Nicos Anastasiades said.

NICOSIA – Four decades of division Cyprus, separating Cypriots from Turks who still unlawfully occupy the northern third of the island, could be ended because of possible energy reserves off the coast, but Cypriot President Nicos Anastasiades said he’ll walk away from new negotiations if Turkish vessels violate Nicosia’s exclusive economic zone.

International companies are searching for oil and gas but Turkey, which said it wants a share even if they are found off lands it doesn’t occupy, has already sent at least one warship into the area as an apparent warning. “We have made it clear that if violations continue, our response will be to leave the talks,” he said.

The resumption of reunification talks was triggered by the agreement of a joint communique with Turkish-Cypriot leader Dervis Eroglu earlier this month.

Anastasiades identified the transfer of national gas from Israel and the discovery of hydrocarbons off Cyprus as the key factor driving a new round of peace talks on the island.

“Hydrocarbons are a decisive factor,” he said. “Turkey has needs, Israel has needs and Cyprus has needs. By solving the Cyprus issue we open up wide horizons,” he told the newspaper Kathimerini in an interview.

He said that energy got the United States, which looked the other way during the 1974 invasion, to suddenly take new interest in reunification especially because American companies want to explore for oil and gas off Cyprus.

“The USA’s interest after the discovery of hydrocarbons in the southeastern Mediterranean creates a new dynamic, especially if the quantities are such that they replace existing monopolies and the political dependencies they create,” said Anastasiades.

Anastasiades spoke to Kathimerini before the executive committee of junior coalition partner DIKO voted for the party to leave the government. The results of the vote were made known after DIKO leader Nicolas Papadopoulos accused Anastasiades of already making major concessions to the Turkish-Cypriots.

“There are so many important concessions, that the Turkish side has achieved most of its aspirations even before negotiations have actually started,” DIKO’s executive committee said in a statement.  The party has four ministers in the 11-member cabinet, including the Energy and Defense portfolios.

In an earlier interview with The Associated Press,  Anastasiades said a deal would allow Turkey to be supplied with newly-found Cypriot and Israeli natural gas and contribute to improving relations between Ankara and Tel Aviv.

Anastasiades said that the United States was instrumental in the resumption of stalled peace talks with breakaway Turkish Cypriots and that the growing interest in an accord is grounded in the potential for regional energy cooperation and helping to dampen down instability in a turbulent area.

He says Israel could also export its offshore gas to Turkey through a reunified Cyprus and that Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu may visit Cyprus in the spring.