Greece: New Bid to Understand Prehistoric Engineering Feat

In this undated photo provide by the Greek Culture Ministry on Tuesday, Oct. 5, 2019, the outlines of recently discovered buildings on the Mycenaean citadel of Glas in Greece are seen from the air. (Greek Culture Ministry via AP)

ATHENS (AP) — Archaeologists excavating a vast 3,300-year-old fortress northwest of Athens are hoping to shed light on one of the most impressive engineering feats of ancient Greece.

The Culture Ministry says the results of work at Glas, a low, flat hill commanding a sprawling plain, have been “particularly encouraging,” revealing meticulously planned building complexes of an uncanny uniformity unknown in other contemporary sites.

For most of its history the plain was a lake surrounded by swamps. It was only fully drained in 1931. But for a brief period in the 13th century B.C., local rulers changed the river courses and built huge dikes to create thousands of acres of farmland.

Just decades later, Glas and its waterworks were abandoned, while the surrounding fields reverted to wetlands for the next three millennia.


By NICHOLAS PAPHITIS Associated Press

In this undated photo provide by the Greek Culture Ministry on Tuesday, Oct. 5, 2019, a smashed pottery water jar found in the Mycenaean citadel of Glas in Greece is seen. Archaeologists excavating a vast 3,300-year-old fortress northwest of Athens are hoping to shed light on one of the most impressive engineering feats of ancient Greece. The Culture Ministry says the results of work at Glas, a low, flat hill commanding a sprawling plain, have been “particularly encouraging,” revealing meticulously-planned building complexes. (Greek Culture Ministry via AP)
In this undated photo provide by the Greek Culture Ministry on Tuesday, Oct. 5, 2019, a copper double-headed axe found buried in the Mycenaean citadel of Glas in Greece is seen. Archaeologists excavating a vast 3,300-year-old fortress northwest of Athens are hoping to shed light on one of the most impressive engineering feats of ancient Greece. The Culture Ministry says the results of work at Glas, a low, flat hill commanding a sprawling plain, have been “particularly encouraging,” revealing meticulously-planned building complexes. (Greek Culture Ministry via AP)

1 Comment

  1. If you have ever used an analog computer (whether lumped parameter of field foil) you understand there is more than one way to skin a cat. Just because we now use digital simulation for everything does not mean it is the only or even the most efficient way to do things. We are blinded by our own tools and fail to se eothe rways of doing things, so we think we, today, invented everything. This is why the Archaic or Classical Greeks (more correct term than Ancient, or Homeric) believed history was cyclical instead of th emodern anthropocentric Hegelian model of linear progression.

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