Upcoming Chicago Performance of Nick the Greek

Nick the Greek, the acclaimed one woman show written, produced, and performed by Angeliki Giannakopoulos and directed by Amy Chaffee is coming to Chicago for a special one-night event. Photo: Courtesy of Angeliki Giannakopoulos

CHICAGO – Nick the Greek, the acclaimed one woman show written, produced, and performed by Angeliki Giannakopoulos and directed by Amy Chaffee is coming to Chicago for a special one-night event on Saturday, Sept. 15, 8 PM at the Greenhouse Theater Center, 2257 N. Lincoln Avenue. The event will include a post-show wine reception with Giannakopoulos. Tickets are on sale now at greenhousetheater.org.

Nick the Greek tells the true story of Nick, an illegal Greek immigrant, who grew up in a world where his ambitions were greater than what his country could offer him.

We see this story unfold over the course of 40 years. His journey begins in a small village, close to Kalamata, Greece, where he was born. Nick survived World War II, became a tailor by trade, got married, and had three children. One day, he brings a suitcase home and tells his wife to pack it. He was leaving for America to create the life he always dreamed of since he was a little boy. He had heard that in America, dollars grow on trees.

Nick’s daughter, Angeliki, puts her 29-year experience of theater and storytelling into the most emotional, personal, funny, and heart-wrenching performance of her life. Every item on stage has a personal meaning for her. Every suit she wears, are suits that her father, Nick, made with his own hands 50 years ago. This is an immigration story that provides a personal perspective of a young man chasing the “American Dream” as so many millions of people have done before him and continue to do today. Now, more than ever, the dialogue surrounding this topic is evolving, which is why the story of “Nick The Greek” is one that needs to be told, and needs to be told now. It is also a way for the children of immigrants to understand and appreciate the sacrifices their parents endured to give them a better life, and to ask the question “Who do they want to become?”

In a previous interview with The National Herald, Giannakopoulos said that she was inspired to do the show because “I love these characters. I know these characters in my bones. Once I decided to write the piece four years ago, it was just very easy to get on the page. It flowed. And my father was the easiest character to write. Maybe being a filmmaker I saw him as a very rich character, full of culture, life, and conflict. I want to do the piece in as many cities in the U.S. as will invite me.”

The show is produced by (Antiope) Tobie Loomis and Kathy Roupas and recently completed a successful run in Los Angeles. Last October, the show was presented as part of the United Solo Festival in Manhattan.

More information is available online: greenhousetheater.org.